50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

Join Us in Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington.

50th anniversary march

WHERE: Terry Schrunk Plaza (SW 3rd Ave and SW Madison St)

WHEN: August 24th (10am)

WHAT: March and Rally: The rally will focus on seizing this opportunity to organize around civil rights and demand that systematic injustices and inequities are addressed.

This event will coincide with the national event in Washington, D.C., bringing together local activists & communities in solidarity with the ongoing Civil Rights movement.

The issues that compelled the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, including lack of economic opportunity and police brutality, are still the pressing issues for communities of color and LGBT people of color today.

The commemorative march will begin at 10am on August 24th, at Terry Schrunk Plaza and we will march to South Waterfront Park, where the rally, speakers, and music will begin at 1pm.

Please use this link to sign up for the march: http://bit.ly/PDXMarch50

Sponsored by Basic Rights Oregon, Albina Ministerial Alliance, PFLAG (Portland, Black Chapter), and community partners.

 

What I learned at General Synod 29 – July 2013

by John Hickox, Dufur, Oregon
I thought “bullying” was about high-school cheerleaders making fun of the girl with a bad complexion or 8th grade boys pushing around 4th grade math whizzes.

That is, of course, one dimension of bullying, but there is much more!

I didn’t REALLY understand the issue until a woman who, shall we say, doesn’t quite fit our image of a person in a leadership position in the church, stood up and said, “I was bullied in kindergarten, I was bullied in grade school, I was bullied in high school, I was bullied in college, I was bullied in seminary, I WAS BULLIED 5 MINUTES AGO WHEN I APPROACHED THIS MICROPHONE TO SPEAK!”

THE HUNGER AND STARVATION MOONS

By Don Johnson, Zion United Church of Christ, Gresham, Oregon

I once read Native Americans call this time of the year the Hunger and Starvation Moons. I don’t know if this is true or if it’s Hollywood. It is true, however, that this time of year is a time of hunger if you are homeless, jobless, broke, physically disabled, mentally disabled, or all of the above.

During the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, we are very generous and give food and funds to help feed people who cannot feed themselves. After the holiday season, we tend to relax and give less than we did before. Because of this pattern of giving, food pantries and kitchens are often short of food during the months after the holidays.

We at Zion United Church of Christ in Gresham learned about this problem when a woman from St. Henry’s Catholic Church in Gresham told us about their food kitchen during a “Mission Moment” in our Sunday service. Our Social Action Team decided to help. We asked our congregation to cut and freeze their Thanksgiving turkey carcasses, along with left over turkey from their family dinner. We also welcomed whole turkeys. During the week after Thanksgiving, we boiled turkey carcasses, skimmed the broth, and added onions, celery, carrots and herbs. We poured the soup into one-gallon bags for the freezer. Now the soup must simply be thawed, and noodles, rice, barley or dumplings can be added to make a delicious, hot meal in this cold hungry time.